Landsvirkjun supports innovation in the energy sector

18. November 2011


The University of Reykjavik, Innovit and Landsvirkjun hosted a lunchtime seminar on the occasion of the Global Entrepreneurship Week in Iceland titled Innovation in the Energy Sector – Opportunities in Geothermal Power. The seminar explored the earth's geothermal power, an area that holds of great future potential in Iceland. During one week each November, the Global Entrepreneurship Week inspires people everywhere through local, national and global activities designed to help them explore their potential as self-starters and innovators.

Oli-Gretar-HRDr. Óli Grétar Blöndal Sveinsson, Executive Vice President Research and Development, opened the seminar and introduced the operations and future plans of Landsvirkjun. The company aims to become a global leader in the field of renewable geothermal power and Dr. Sveinsson explained upcoming geothermal projects in north Iceland as well as some of the company's research and development projects. Dr. Sveinsson took as an example the Iceland Deep Drilling Project, an international long-term project which aims to discover if energy from deeper and hotter drill holes can be harnessed. If the project is successful, it will lead to geothermal drill holes ten times more powerful than conventional ones.
Dr. Sveinsson, Executive Vice President of
Research and Development at Landsvirkjun at
the open seminar.


Mr. Steindór Harðarsson, MSc student at REYST, University of Reykjavik, was the next speaker. Mr. Harðarsson introduced his thesis which explores how to use superheated geothermal steam. In his work, Mr. Harðarsson developed various models and computer simulations on how various cleansing techniques work. Mr. Harðarsson hopes that his research will enable practitioners to make more informed decisions on how to clean superheated geothermal steam and stop eroding from hot and chemical rich drill holes.

Dr. Arnþór Ævarsson, CEO of Prokatín introduced his company's operations which is developing technology for the production of single-cell protein utilizing hydrogen- and sulfur- oxidizing bacteria. Prokatín puts an emphasis on the utilization of hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in the efflux from geothermal power stations as an energy and carbon source. The technology makes it possible to produce high quality protein-rich meal for use in animal and fish feed similar to the use of fish meal today. Equally important are the environmental benefits since the technology will also be used to reduce emissions of undesirable gases into the atmosphere.

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